Testimonials

img_4601-2

Adoptees just know. You don’t have to explain yourself and you don’t feel silly for being sad/angry/upset about certain things. We laugh and cry together. When one of us hurts, we all hurt. Adoptees gave me much strength and advice during my search. We are a family. – Hea Ryun G. Houston via Pusan S. Korea

img_4600

Adoptees are my Lifeline’s. They speak my language when I share, when everyone else just looks at me all silly. I value them and when I can see them in person in real life it’s like we’ve been reunited after a long separation because our spirits connect with that common thread of being Adoptees! I couldn’t do it without them! – Pamela K. Lexington, KY

img_4600

Right now, the only contact that I have with other adoptees is via Facebook and email, but I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I can’t describe how helpful it is to be able to share with another human being what is really going on inside, what’s happening in my head, and have them share how they truly understand, and that it’s ok. I can’t wait to find out what it’s like to share at this level in person. – Kevin E. Lancaster, PA

img_4600

Connecting w fellow adoptees has been magical, inspirational and enlightening. Most of my relationships w adoptees has been online, but many of those connections have turned into real-life and phone/video chat experiences, (plus knowing other adoptees through writing!) I wish we all lived closer and that conventions/ conferences / workshops, etc. were more frequent and or closer to home. – Paige S. Cincinnati, OH

img_4600

Many of my friends are adoptees from different Latin American countries, such as myself. For one week in June many of us participate in an all-volunteer day camp for children adopted from Latin America & their siblings. I have participated in some way in all 25 years of its existence. I started out as a camper, & now I teach one of the classes there. I feel as though this camp has created a bond that is so unbelievably strong and supporting, to the point that I feel that it’s stronger than the friendships created in school! Many of my fellow adoptees that started off with me at this camp now have children taking part, so a second generation of campers started many years ago! I consider these people family, & I can’t imagine my life without them!! – Dave D.  Parma Heights, OH

img_4600

I knew I was adopted all my life but as a child I always felt inferior and as if I didn’t fit in. I had a wonderful childhood and wonderful parents but still felt like an outsider. Meeting other adoptees as adults and hearing similar stories helped me realize what I was feeling was normal. – Jeannie, Dutchess County, New York

img_4600

I always felt out of place and never felt like I belonged. I now have found similar stories and others who have been through what I’ve been through. It’s comforting in a crazy way – Jody R. 

img_4600

It has been absolutely amazing to find out how similar our stories are and how we say the exact same things. Plus I was experiencing some brutal depression, and decided I needed therapy of some kind, the wait was too long. Then I found a group, I belonged and have been “growing” in the most positive way. They are my family and I’m not alone anymore! – Mish S. Barview, OR

img_4600

All interaction is good – if positive all the better . We have an opportunity to validate our own feelings. – Barbra D. Sault Sante Marie, Ontario 

img_4600

It’s help to connect with other adoptees. I know that I’m not alone. I know that my fellow adoptees understand. We “get” each other. I know that this feeling of not fitting in is what other adoptees feel. It’s nice to be able to discuss adoptee problems with other adoptees. – Holly C. Indianapolis, IN

img_4600

I was ‘blessed’ in that respect by being just one of 6 girls born between September 1968 and January 1969, and adopted into families living within a 5km radius of each other (one lived in same street, another in the next street). We were all in the same year at school so there was a definite safety-in-numbers mentality so we were able to avoid the ‘unwanted’ or ‘bastard’ taunts experienced by other Adoptees. My BFF is an adoptee but she went through hell at denominational schools being bullied and taunted by other kids for being adopted. We have been an ongoing source of comfort and support to each for the last 24 years as our histories were similar. We were both third child i.e. we have older siblings, our parents had been married and our first-fathers were servicemen. We have supported each other’s reunions and we have been able to say what we were feeling without a fear of being judged, true feelings that offend the sheeple. The support pages have also been a great place to vent. This is where I found out that it is okay to not be okay with being Adopted or with Adoption in general! – Teresa D. Sydney, Australia

img_4600

It feels validating to be with the only people who can truly understand me. – Christine K. Reston, VA.

img_4600

When I’m with other adoptees, I love that I don’t have to worry about watching what I say about the adoption industry. I love the way we can talk about our experiences and usually find that we have a lot in common. I love that we understand each other’s challenges and don’t invalidate each other’s perceptions. – Patti H. 

img_4600

Being around other adoptees has been very validating, all of my best friends, starting in kindergarten, have been adopted. I am grateful for other adoptees. – Sandra D. Long Beach, CA

img_4600

Connecting with fellow adoptees has been life changing to say the least. To finally find others who truly understand your truth, and to validate it even without knowing who you are, speaks volumes in trying to heal. One no longer needs to justify the feelings and experiences we’ve gone through as adoptees and find a new kind of family within these communities that cater specifically to adoptees. – Maria H.  Toronto, Ontario 

img_4600

Connecting with fellow adoptees has been enlightening. Much like any support group where a member speaks their truth and names their pain, I have seen people share what they struggle with, sometimes needing intervention and more often needing inspiration. Knowing that others feel that disconnect with others because of abandonment issues has helped encourage me to keep reaching out, keep searching. – Scott M. Adult Adoptee

img_4600

Being an adoptee is certainly difficult. Being a biracial Native American adoptee cut off from my entire culture was extremely difficult. Finding others like myself was and is sad, but it lets me know I was not alone. So many of us thought we were the only ones, but unfortunately there are tens of thousands of us taken by the gov’t. Finding others has allowed me an avenue into a beautiful rich and loving culture. I’m no longer half a human I am whole. – Debrah N. Adult Adoptee

img_4600

I’m no longer alone. I have people I can talk to and we can share the good, bad and ugly. – – Maria B. Adult Adoptee 

img_4600

Power and understanding in numbers. It aids in our coping and journeys. I’m so thankful. – Sue C. Adult Adoptee 

img_4600

My feelings have finally been validated, I’m not alone anymore. – Brenda G. Adult Adoptee 

img_4600